Monthly Archives: July 2011

Bubble Up





Homer Soda Company

Bubble Up in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Wikipedia:

Bubble Up is a lemon-lime soda pop brand. It was first made in 1917, by Sweet Valley Products Co. of Sandusky, Ohio.[1]

In 1978, Bubble Up was purchased by The Monarch Beverage Company of Atlanta, Georgia. Monarch owned the brand until 2007, when the company sold it along with theDad’s Root BeerDr. Wells and Sun Crest brands to The Dad’s Root Beer Co., LLC ofJasper, Indiana.[2][3] Bubble Up is manufactured by Dad’s Root Beer for the U.S. market and by Monarch for international markets (in particular Asia and Africa). Since its purchase by Dad’s Root Beer, Bubble Up is sweetened with high fructose corn syrup, and not cane sugar.

History

Bubble Up began in 1919 as a lemon-lime carbonated soft drink.[2] Originally owned by Sweet Valley Productions of Sandusky, Ohio, Bubble Up was produced ten years prior to its well-known competitor, 7 Up. Subsequently the brand was owned by the Bubble Up Company, Inc. of Chicago. With the tag line, “A kiss of Lemon, A kiss of Lime”, Bubble Up was distributed in the Coca-Cola bottler network prior to Sprite. The Monarch Company of Atlanta purchased Bubble Up in 1978. In 2007, Bubble Up was purchased by Hedinger Brands, LLC and licensed to The Dad’s Root Beer Company, LLC. The company headquarters is now located in Jasper, Indiana.

Nichol Kola





Homer Soda Company

Nichol Kola in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

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Verners Ginger Ale





Homer Soda Company

Verners Ginger Ale in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Wikipedia:

History

Although Vernors is the oldest surviving ginger ale sold in the United States, there were a number of brands of ginger ale and ginger beer sold in commerce prior to 1866.[2]

According to company legend, prior to the start of the American Civil War, while a clerk at the Higby & Sterns drugstore in Detroit, James Vernor experimented with flavors in an attempt to duplicate a popular ginger ale imported from Dublin, Ireland. When Vernor was called off to serve in the war, he stored the syrup base of 19 ingredients, including gingervanilla and other natural flavorings, in an oak cask. Vernor joined the 4th Michigan Cavalry on 14 August 1862 as a hospital steward, was promoted to second lieutenant on 20 September 1864, and was discharged on 1 July 1865. After returning from battle four years later, he opened the keg and found the drink inside had been changed by the aging process in the wood. It was like nothing else he had ever tasted, and he purportedly declared it “Deliciously different,” which remains the drink’s motto to this day. In a 1936 interview, however, his son, James Vernor Jr., suggested that the formula was not developed until after the war. This was confirmed in a 1962 interview with former company president, James Vernor Davis.[3]

Vernor opened a drugstore of his own on Woodward Avenue, at the corner of Clifford Street[4]and sold his ginger ale at its soda fountain. According to the 1911 trademark application on “Vernor’s” as a name for ginger ale and extract, Vernors entered commerce in 1880. City by city, Vernor sold bottling franchises, with operators of those franchises required to strictly adhere to the recipe. In 1896, Vernor closed his drugstore and opened a soda fountain closer to the city center, on Woodward Avenue south of Jefferson Avenue, near the ferry docks on the Detroit River to concentrate on the ginger ale business alone.[4] Initially, Vernors was only sold via soda fountain franchises[5] The early Vernors soda fountains featured ornate plaster, lighting and ironwork featuring a “V” design, examples of which still exist, such as at the Halo Burger restaurant in Flint, Michigan.[4][6][7][8][9] Later Vernors was bottled for home consumption.[5]

James Vernor died October 29, 1927 and was succeeded by his son, James Vernor Jr. Expansion continued throughout Prohibition. In 1962, Vernors introduced Vernors 1-Calorie, now called Diet Vernors. In 1966, the Vernor family sold out to the first of a succession of owners.[10] The company was next acquired by American Consumer Products and then by United Brands before being purchased byA&W Beverages in 1987. A&W was later purchased by Cadbury Schweppes.

Just prior to the onset of World War II, James Vernor II presided over the construction of a 230,000 sq ft (21,000 m2) bottling plant and headquarters, encompassing an entire city block on Woodward Avenue, one block from the Detroit River. In the late 1950s, when the City of Detroit proposed construction of Cobo Hall and other riverfront projects, a land-swap was negotiated, and Vernors moved its bottling plant and headquarters to the location of the old civic exhibition hall at 4501 Woodward Avenue, incorporating many of the popular features of the old plant. Tours of the Vernors plant old and new were major tourist attractions. The flagship Detroit bottling plant was shut down by United Brands in 1985, with the local rights to bottle Vernors granted to Pepsi-Cola.[5] The Woodward Avenue plant was later demolished.[11]

Slogans

A number of slogans have been associated with Vernors over the years. Advertising in the early 1900s used the slogan “Detroit’s Drink”.[4] According to its trademark application, it began using the slogan “Deliciously Different” in 1921.[12] The labels formerly read “Aged 4 years in wood”, which was changed some years ago to “Flavor aged in oak barrels”, again in 1996 to “Barrel Aged, Bold Taste” and currently notes “Barrel Aged 3 Years • Bold Taste”.[13] The apostrophe in the name “Vernor’s” was dropped in the late 1950s.[4] For a time in the mid-1980s Vernors used the slogan “It’s what we drink around here” in its advertising campaigns.[14][15][16] The gnome mascot, named “Woody”, was used from the turn of the century until 1987, when it was dropped by A&W Brands in favor of new packaging,[5] but had returned to the packaging by the 2000s.[citation needed]

Flavor and Characteristics

Vernors is a golden ginger ale with a robust flavor, more like a ginger beer, that historically was flavored and colored with caramel. This style was common before Prohibition when “dry” pale ginger ale, typified by Canada Dry, became popular as an alcoholic mixer.[17]

Vernors is highly carbonated. Some people consume Vernors hot as a remedy for stomachache, with ginger being the active ingredient.[18]

LA Metropolitan News Editor Roger Grace describes the original flavor as “mellow yet perky with the mellowness attributed to the aging in oak barrels, and the perkiness to the use of more ginger and sugar than “dry” ginger ales. Many people believe that the taste of Vernors has changed significantly in recent years. Grace describes the current flavor as an “emaciated version of a product that once was” and “sweetened carbonated water with ginger flavoring”. Theories as to the reason for the claimed change in flavor include that the secret formula has been changed to use new products not originally available to Vernor, such as high fructose corn syrup; that it seems to have less carbonation than formerly; and that Vernors is no longer aged four years, but three in oak barrels.[5][13]

 

AJ Stephans Birch Beer

Homer Soda Company

AJ Stephans Birch Beer in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

AJ Stephans:

AJ·Stephans makes the world’s best Ginger Beer! Our traditional flavor is gingery, citrusy and has just the right bite. We use the finest ingredients and pure artesian water. We sweeten with only pure cane sugar, not a fructose blend, and it’s the real sugar that enhances the unique flavor qualities of authentic Ginger Beer! Try our Ginger Beer Recipes for the best “Dark & Stormy”, “Moscow Mule” or “Shandygaff”.

AJ·Stephans also blends a full line of New England Style Tonics (soda to the rest of the world). We make all our flavors with pure water and cane sugar.

AJ Stephans Lemon and Lime

Homer Soda Company

AJ Stephans Lemon & Lime in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

AJ Stephans:

AJ·Stephans makes the world’s best Ginger Beer! Our traditional flavor is gingery, citrusy and has just the right bite. We use the finest ingredients and pure artesian water. We sweeten with only pure cane sugar, not a fructose blend, and it’s the real sugar that enhances the unique flavor qualities of authentic Ginger Beer! Try our Ginger Beer Recipes for the best “Dark & Stormy”, “Moscow Mule” or “Shandygaff”.

AJ·Stephans also blends a full line of New England Style Tonics (soda to the rest of the world). We make all our flavors with pure water and cane sugar.

Seadog Root Beer

Homer Soda Company

Seadog Root Beer in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Seadog Website:

The original Sea Dog Brewing Co. was founded by Pete Camplin, Sr. on May 17th, 1993 in the historic shipbuilding town of Camden, Maine, starting with a 240 seat brewpub and kegging brewery overlooking the dramatic waterfall of the old Knox Woolen Mill.

On March 8th, 1995, Sea Dog opened a second facility, this time a 540 seat restaurant and brewery on the banks of the historic Penobscot River in downtown Bangor.

In 2002, master brewer Alan Pugsley and entrepreneur Fred Forsley became the new owners of Sea Dog. Their crew continues the tradition of serving great food in a great atmosphere and brewing a full line of handcrafted ales that capture the spirit of Maine’s sea-faring history.

Today, Sea Dog Brewing Company operates brew pubs in three locations. The Sea Dog in Topsham occupies a scenic spot on the Androscoggin River. The Bangor location overlooks the historic Penobscot River. The South Portland location is near the Maine Mall. All three of these locations serve a full menu of handcrafted ales and creative pub fare with a flair.

Being authentic is important to us. Our beers are brewed in a traditional style using only the highest quality ingredients like imported English two-row malted barley and British top-fermenting yeast. Our English brewing style results in brews with a distinctive, refreshing taste and crisp finish unique to top-fermented beers.

Cheers!

Barney was the Sea Dog Brewing Company’s apprentice brewmaster and figurehead. Sadly he is no longer with us, but his spirit lives on. A Great Pyrenees, which were originally bred for their dauntless protection of mountain flocks and as official guard dogs for the French court in the 17th century, Barney continued this age old tradition by posting guard over the brew kettle as it boiled.

Although, the Great Pyrenees breed usually dislikes the water, Barney loved it and dove right in whenever he got the chance.

As a boating “enthusiast” he began sailing at three months and thus acquired his nickname of “Sea Dog”. Barney was just as at home on deck as on land.

Bulldog Root Beer





Homer Soda Company

Bulldog Root Beer in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Bulldog Website:

Bulldog Root Beer is different from other national brands of root beer. Here’s why:

First, we use only the best ingredients, which means the most expensive ingredients. For example, we use real cane sugar instead of corn syrup, and we use pure vanilla extract instead of artificial vanillin. Also, Bulldog Root Beer is actually brewed, which means it is cooked, just like in the old days. Brewing root beer is rare, but it develops certain flavors that you just can’t get any other way.

We are perfectionists when it comes to root beer taste, and we spent two years developing nine test batches until we finally found the exact recipe we wanted to use.

Bulldog Root Beer is gently carbonated so that the delicate vanilla and honey flavors come through in the aroma. It is best served chilled without ice.  

The Bulldogs on the Label are named Barley and Hops. They are real bulldogs and live in Fresno, California. Barley is the male, and Hops is the female. They like to chew on bones and rawhide treats, and can fetch and play dead on command.

 

Cock n Bull Ginger Beer





Homer Soda Company

Cock n Bull Ginger Beer in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

TV Food and Drink:

The credit for popularizing vodka in the U.S. goes to the company of Heublein, Inc., an American alcohol distributor who in 1938 acquired all rights to Smirnoff Vodka, which had its own origins in Moscow in the mid 1860s. The original purchaser of the U.S. rights to Smirnoff failed to gain any traction trying to sell Americans on what they were missing, and turned over the rights to John Martin, the President of Heublein, who hoped to have more success with it.

And initially, he didn’t. At first, vodka only found U.S. admirers in the form of newly-transplanted Eastern European immigrants. The natives simply found it too overpowering.

It wasn’t until the early 1940s when Martin connected with his friend, John Morgan, owner of a English style pub on Sunset Strip called The Cock’n Bull that the Mule started really kicking and the vodka started really pouring!
cock n bull The Moscow Mule

Morgan was simply looking to unload a few cases of his own unsold ginger beer. The marriage of the two failed beverages was an instant sensation with the Hollywood crowd. From there, Martin’s brilliance for promotion and a little copper cup took the Mule on the rest of its journey to stardom.

Pig Iron Cola


Homer Soda Company

Pig Iron Cola in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Review:

 “So I learned that Pig Iron BBQ is a restaurant in Seattle, Washington. It’s a BBQ lovers paradise, that just happens to be into old fashioned soda pop. You can go there and wash down your pulled pork and cole slaw with a number of old fashioned drinks including Bubble Up, Orange Crush, and Grape Nehi, just to name a few.

The Pig Iron Cola is bottled by Orca Beverage Soda works, and is made from pure cane sugar.

This bottle was drank by my wife, so here is her opinion on the flavor:
5starsWhen it comes to cola, this one is more Coke than Pepsi. But you would have to drink a 6-pack of Coke to get the satisfaction you get from one bottle of Pig Iron. It has a rich, dark flavor and just the right amount of carbonation. Great to wash down your favorite salty snack with.”

Moxie





Homer Soda Company

Moxie in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Wikipedia:

Moxie is a carbonated beverage that was one of the first mass-produced soft drinks in theUnited States. It continues to be regionally popular today.

Moxie has a unique flavor that is not as sweet as that of most modern soft drinks and that is described by some as “bitter.”

Moxie is closely associated with the state of Maine and was designated the official soft drink of Maine on May 10, 2005.[1] Its creator, Dr. Augustin Thompson, was born in Union, Maine.

Moxie originated as a patent medicine called “Moxie Nerve Food,”[2] which was created around 1876 by Dr. Augustin Thompson of Union, Maine.[3] Thompson claimed that it contained an extract from a rare, unnamed South American plant, which had supposedly been discovered by a friend of his, Lieutenant Moxie,[2] who had used it as a panacea. Moxie, he claimed, was especially effective against “paralysis, softening of the brain, nervousness, and insomnia.”[2]

After a few years, Thompson added soda water to the formula and changed the product’s name to “Beverage Moxie Nerve Food.” By 1884 he was selling Moxie both in bottles and in bulk as a soda fountain syrup. He marketed it as “a delicious blend of bitter and sweet, a drink to satisfy everyone’s taste.”[4]

A lawsuit was filed in 1907 by the Moxie Nerve Food Company of New England against the Modox Company and others, alleging that they had copied the ingredients of Moxie and were using the name “Modox,”[5] which closely resembled “Moxie,” and were infringing upon patents and trademarks.[6] The suit was dismissed by the judge, who said the court could not protect the legitimate part of the plaintiff’s business in this case. In a later case in New York, the Moxie Nerve Food Company won a lawsuit against Modox, which subsequently went out of business.[5]

President Calvin Coolidge was known to favor the drink, and Boston Red Sox slugger Ted Williams endorsed it on radio and in print. The company also marketed a beverage called “Ted’s Root Beer” in the early sixties. Author E. B. White once claimed that “Moxie contains gentian root, which is the path to the good life.”[7] Currently, one of the ingredients of Moxie is “Gentian Root Extractives,” which may contribute to the drink’s unique flavor.[8]

The brand suffered a significant decline in sales during the 1930s, which is thought to have been caused by the company’s decision to expand its sugar reserves at the expense of its popular advertising campaign.

Due to competition from Coca-Cola, demand for Moxie has waned in recent years, although the brand persists in New England andPennsylvania.

Sugar-free Diet Moxie was introduced in 1962.

Through extensive advertising, the neologism “moxie” has entered popular American usage with the meaning “courage, daring, and energy,”[9][10] as in “This guy’s got moxie!”

In its advertising, Moxie used “Make Mine Moxie!” advertising jingles, the slogan “Just Make It Moxie for Mine,” and a “Moxie Man” logo.

A unique advertising tool was the Moxie Horsemobile, a modified automobile whose driver sat on a large model of a horse. The first Horsemobiles were deployed around 1918. A 1935 Rolls-Royce Moxie Horsemobile was sold for $55,000 at the May 20, 2011, Mecum Auction in IndianapolisIndiana. Moxie at one time maintained about two dozen of them, and they appeared in parades and other public functions.

Every summer, “all things Moxie” are celebrated at the Moxie Festival in Lisbon Falls, Maine.

There is a Moxie museum in Union, Maine, which houses a 30-foot-tall wooden Moxie bottle, once used as a soda stand, and other historical Moxie artifacts. This is an annex to the Matthews Museum of Maine Heritage, which is located at the Union Fairgrounds.

The Moxie brand was purchased in 1966 by the Monarch Beverage Company of Atlanta. In 2007 Monarch sold it to its current owner, Cornucopia Beverages Inc. of Bedford, New Hampshire, which is owned by the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Northern New England, a subsidiary of the Kirin Brewery Company, based in Tokyo.[11]

Cornucopia cites increasing requests for Moxie from fans across the country in its decision to step up efforts to distribute the product. In 2007 it launched pilot sales in Florida and in 2010 granted distribution in Florida to Florida Micro Beverage Distributors.[3]

In 2007, Cornucopia organized a sampling event at the Mohegan Sun casino in Uncasville, Connecticut.

The Catawissa Bottling Company in Catawissa, Pennsylvania, is one of six bottlers in the United States that produce Moxie. Catawissa has produced it since 1945.[12]