Monthly Archives: June 2011

RC Cola

Homer Soda Company

Royal Crown Cola in the glass-bottle

Only available for private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Wikipedia:

The first product in the Royal Crown line was Chero-Cola in 1904, followed by Royal Crown Ginger Ale, Royal Crown Strawberry and Royal Crown Root Beer. The company was renamed Chero-Cola, and in 1925 called Nehi Corporation after its colored and flavored drinks. In 1934, Chero-Cola was reformulated by Rufus Kamm, a chemist, and re-released as Royal Crown Cola.

In the 1950s, the combination of Royal Crown Cola and Moonpies became popular as the “working man’s lunch” in the American South.[1] In 1954, Royal Crown was the first to sell a soft drink in a can, and later the first company to sell a soft drink in an aluminum can.[2]

In 1958, the company introduced the first diet cola, Diet Rite, and in 1980, a caffeine-free cola, RC 100. In the mid-1990s, RC releasedRoyal Crown Draft Cola, billed as a “premium” cola and using pure cane sugar as a sweetener, rather than the high fructose corn syrup more commonly used in the United States. Offered only in 12-ounce bottles, the cola’s sales were disappointing due largely to the inability of the RC bottling network to get distribution for the product in single-drink channels and it was quickly discontinued with the exceptions ofAustraliaNew Zealand and France. It is now only available in New Zealand. The company has also released Cherry RC — a cherry flavored version of the RC soft drink — to compete with Coca-Cola Cherry and Pepsi Wild Cherry.

In October 2000, Royal Crown was acquired by Cadbury Schweppes plc through its acquisition of Snapple. Royal Crown operations were folded into Dr Pepper/Seven Up, Inc., a former subsidiary of Cadbury Schweppes. In 2001, all international RC-branded business were sold to Cott Beverages ofMississauga, OntarioCanada, and is operated as Royal Crown Cola International which handles RC Cola products outside the United States. In the U.S., distribution is still handled by Dr Pepper Snapple Group.[3]

The RC Cola brand has been marketed through many campaigns. In the 1930s, Alex Osborn, with BBDO, made them an ad campaign, in which was included the following slogan: “The season’s best.” The 1940s featured a magazine advertising campaign with actress Lizabeth Scott as the face, next to the slogan “RC tastes best, says Lizabeth Scott”. In the 1960s, Royal Crown Cola did an ad campaign featuring two birds, made by Jim HensonNancy Sinatra was featured in two Royal Crown Cola commercials in her one hour special called “Movin’ With Nancy” featuring various singers, David Winters and his Emmy Award winning choreography[4] in November 1967. She sang, “It’s a mad, mad, mad Cola… RC the one with the mad, mad taste!…RC! ” The company was the official sponsor of New York Mets off and on at times during the 1960s, 70s and 80s. A television commercial in the New York area featured Tom Seaver, New York Mets pitcher, and his wife, Nancy, dancing on top of a dugout at Shea Stadium and singing the same tune from the Sinatra campaign. In the mid 1970s, Royal Crown ran the “Me & My RC” advertisements. Others featured people in a variety of scenic outdoor locations. The jingle, sung by Louise Mandrell, which went, “Me and my RC / Me and my RC /’Cause what’s good enough / For other folks / Ain’t good enough for me.” RC was introduced to Israel in 1995 with the slogan “RC: Just like in America!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dang Butterscotch Root Beer

Homer Soda Company

Dang Butterscotch Root Beer in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Butterscotch is by far one of our most popular sodas!  Who would have thought to add butterscotch to a root beer??  But it’s very tasty and it’s been a hit everywhere it’s been!

Dang is bottled by family run bottling plant in Milwaukee.  They have been bottling for over 45 years!  It’s a quant little operation that we’ve visited a few times, it’s so refreshing to see family businesses still running!

Diet Dang Root Beer

Homer Soda Company

Dang Diet Root Beer in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Dang is bottled by family run bottling plant in Milwaukee.  They have been bottling for over 45 years!  It’s a quant little operation that we’ve visited a few times, it’s so refreshing to see family businesses still running!

Original Dang Root Beer

Homer Soda Company

Dang Root Beer in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Dang is bottled by family run bottling plant in Milwaukee.  They have been bottling for over 45 years!  It’s a quant little operation that we’ve visited a few times, it’s so refreshing to see family businesses still running!

Dr Pepper, 12 oz

Homer Soda Company

12 oz Dr Pepper in the glass-bottle

Only available for private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Not available wholesale to retail outlets.

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Made with cane sugar, this is not a “throw back”, it’s always been made this way.  The bottling plant that produces this soda has been making cane sugar Dr Pepper products in the glass bottle for generations.  Very tasty!

Capt’n Eli’s Blueberry Pop

Homer Soda Company

Capt’n Eli’s Blueberry Pop in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

This is a personal favorite of mine.  For those of you who are also beer enthusiasts, you might have heard of Shipyard Beer Company.  Capt’n Eli is the soda division of Shipyard!  Their beers are well known for their quality, and they bring the same level of quality to their sodas.  Blueberry, in particular, has a wonderful natural flavor.  The soda is produced in Portland Maine, one of my FAV places to visit, the brewery is just a couple blocks from the ocean!  It’s made with real Maine Blueberries.  The result it a soda that has a very authentic flavor, not the syrup type flavor you usually get from a blueberry soda.  If you are going to try one new soda this week, make it this one!

BevNET Review: Capt’n Eli’s Blueberry Pop is the latest soda to be product by Shipyard Brewing. All other beer companies that are trying to make their own soda should take a look at this lineup as they’ve achieved near perfection. The Blueberry Pop is no exception. With cane sugar and real blueberry juice, this beverage has been harmoniously balanced to create a body that is sweet, smooth, and clean to the finish. The packaging is a bit busy, but it does successfully create a super premium image that fits well with Shipyard’s micro-brew beers. Overall, this is a very well done product whose only limitation is the limited market for carbonated blueberry beverages. Still, it’s a true gem that will please anyone seeking a super premium micro soda.

Original Dr Pepper, 8oz

Homer Soda Company

Dublin Dr Pepper in the glass-bottle

Only available for private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Not available for distribution to retail locations.

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Not only are you getting the original taste with the cane sugar, but you get to drink it out of the coolest bottle!  This soda is bottled by one of the original bottling plants for Dr Pepper and it is located in Dublin, TX (thus the name, Dublin Dr Pepper).

Dublin Dr Pepper Bottling Plant:

Dublin Dr Pepper History

In 1885 Waco, Texas was a wild frontier town, nicknamed “six-shooter junction.” Wade Morrison’s Old Corner Drug Store was a prominent business and popular meeting place in downtown Waco. People came in for everything from flea powder to stationery, from cigars to fountain drinks.

One of Morrison’s employees, pharmacist Charles Alderton, noticed how customers loved the smell of the soda fountain with its many fruit, spice and berry aromas. He wanted to invent a drink that tasted the wonderful way the soda fountain smelled. After much experimentation he finally felt he had hit on “something different.” Patrons at the drug store agreed.

Soon other soda fountains were buying the syrup from Morrison and serving it. People loved the new unnamed drink and would order it by simply calling out “shoot me a Waco!” But Morrison named it Dr Pepper, after the father of a girl he had loved back in his home state of Virginia.

In 1891 Morrison and new partner Robert Lazenby organized the Artesian Manufacturing and Bottling Company in order to bottle and sell Dr Pepper as well as other soft drinks. That same year, while visiting Waco, a Texas businessman by the name of Sam Houston Prim tasted the new fountain drink and knew he wanted to sell it in his bottling plant in Dublin, Texas, 80 miles to the west.

Under the direction of Mr. Lazenby Dr Pepper enjoyed steady growth in sales and began to spread in popularity across the country. But it wasn’t until 1904 that Dr Pepper gained real national exposure. Along with other soon to be favorites like ice cream cones and hamburgers, Dr Pepper was introduced to the rest of the U. S. and the entire world at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.

Since then Dr Pepper’s popularity has grown consistently over the years to become one of the top 3 soft drinks in the United States and the No. 1 non-cola. And over that time Dr Pepper Corporate Headquarters have remained here in Texas. That’s why Dr Pepper can truly claim the title of “Texas Original.”

The Story of “Mr. Dr Pepper”*

Bill Kloster never studied marketing. The words goals, objectives, strategies and tactics weren’t part of his vocabulary.

He didn’t promote his product from a textbook; he promoted it from his heart — a concept that would have left marketing gurus cringing. Except that it worked.

Bill Kloster operated on instinct that was so on target that his tiny three-county Dublin Dr Pepper franchise is continuously among the top 10 producers in per capita consumption.

Bill knew his business. He started at the bottling plant when he was 14 years old — a job necessitated by the death of his father and his need to help support his mother and four siblings. For the next 67 years, including the day he died, he put in long, hands-on hours, focusing on quality control, community involvement and his own unique style of sometimes blustery, sometimes covert public relations.

Bill started as a bottle sorter for 10 cents an hour. He got his first painful lesson in economics when he dropped a pallet of glass bottles. After the damages were deducted from his paycheck, he took home mere pennies — his first paycheck. Before long, plant owner Sam Houston Prim took the young man under his wing, becoming a surrogate father as he watched Bill grow into manhood and into a self-styled promoter of Dublin Dr Pepper.

From the bottle sorting chores, Bill worked his way up to production manager. After a tour of duty in Europe during World War II, he returned to become general manager of the plant which was then operated by Prim’s daughter, Grace Prim Lyon.

Mrs. Lyon died in 1991 on the dawn of the plant’s 100th birthday celebration, leaving the Dublin plant in Bill’s capable hands.

As the owner, Bill continued to emphasize those same values he had learned as a young man. He held on to the original drink formula, the antiquated bottling equipment, and a massive assortment of Dr Pepper collectibles which became his passion. Through the years, he used those elements to develop a successful enterprise and a popular tourist attraction. And most important, he built a fiercely loyal following for Dublin Dr Pepper around the world. The media were drawn to him like bees to honey and dubbed him “Mr. Dr Pepper.”

When bottom line indicated the tiny Dublin plant should give up Imperial Pure Cane Sugar in exchange for less expensive corn sweeteners, Bill balked. He continued to subscribe to the country theory of “dancin’ with who brung ya,” refusing to change the recipe which has always given the local product its unique taste. Bill Kloster, the Dublin bottling plant, and Dublin Dr Pepper remained true to themselves.

The story was widely told that when his wife Iona told Bill he was drinking too much sugar and should switch to the sugar-free variety, he secretly had the regular Dr Pepper put into diet bottles which he stocked in his home refrigerator.

Residents of the community and the region enthusiastically support what they consider “their” Dr Pepper. But Bill was no less enthusiastic about giving back. Seldom does a community event take place without Dr Pepper, usually provided as a donation to a worthy cause. Most of the major projects in the area had a Dr Pepper signature somewhere, even though many of Bill’s contributions were done inconspicuously and, by his choosing, without fanfare.

Bill always spent long hours at the Dr Pepper plant. But following the death in 1995 of Iona Kloster, his beloved wife of 54 years, he dedicated himself to the expansion of the museum collection and the promotion of Old Doc’s Soda Shop.

The years took no apparent toll on Bill mentally, but he deeply resented the physical limitations caused by arthritis. He wore out the knees he came with, and several replacement knees as well. He rarely fussed about the pain, but he fussed often about the inconvenience, particularly when he had to take time out for surgery and rehabilitation. In the summer of 1999, he underwent his last knee surgery. As he began the therapy which would put him back on his feet, he suffered a severe heart attack, followed by several more. His doctors were not optimistic about his survival, much less his recovery.

But miraculously, Bill survived and returned to work, leaping headlong into the development of the commemorative 2000 calendar. He wanted this millennium calendar to be a tribute to the four young ladies who have worn the title of Pretty Peggy Pepper, his favorite advertising icon.

Bill died suddenly on Sept. 27, 1999 after a full day at the bottling plant where he had spent the day approving designs for this 2000 calendar. He is gone only in the physical sense; the echo of his chuckle and the shadow of the wide grin that accompanied his favorite Dr Pepper stories will always be felt in the oldest Dr Pepper plant in the world.

Bill Kloster was a man of conviction. When small bottlers have been gobbled up by conglomerates, the tiny, independent Dublin Dr Pepper plant remains. Its signature product is produced just like it was more than 100 years ago. Bill wasn’t afraid of bucking marketing trends because he believed in the unique quality of his product.

No, it wasn’t the textbook way of doing things.

But it was Bill Kloster’s way.

 

Cripple Creek Dream Lode Golden Ginger Ale

Homer Soda Company

Cripple Creek Dream Lode Golden Ginger Ale in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Beverage World:

When Mike Lynn became president of Cripple Creek Brewing he didn’t take over a family business as much as resurrect a bit of family lore. Although Chicago in the late 1990s was a far cry from the mountains and gold mines of Colorado, Lynn was determined to revive the “halcyon days of Cripple Creek, Colorado” by bringing back a century-old family recipe.

Lynn grew up listening to stories about his great-grand uncle and his adventures in Colorado during the 1890s gold rush. Frank J. Wisner, a Chicago entrepreneur, decided to make his fortune in the Colorado gold mines in an area known as Cripple Creek located west of Colorado Springs. Needing a way to support his Cripple Creek Cow Mountain Mining Company operations, Wisner started brewing sodas to sell to the miners.

According to family legend, Wisner was in one of many drinking establishments on the infamous Myers Avenue, which was known as the “red light district” of Cripple Creek, and was inspired after drinking a new beverage–root beer. His innovative idea was to add molasses to the root beer, which would give miners a heartier beverage, thereby avoiding the embarrassment of having their compatriots think they were temperance advocates. Thus, Myers Avenue Red Root Beer, a cinnamon gourmet root beer with a golden red color, was born.

Wisner also came up with Dream Lode Golden ginger ale after he drank a “magic elixir” of lemon and ginger root and had a dream of striking gold that same night. Next, Wisner developed Celon’s Mythical creme soda, named after the daughter of the man who ran his mines. The sodas struck gold with miners but Wisner did not. The mining operations dried up and he moved back to Chicago in the early 1900s without making a dime.

Lynn says the formulas for the sodas were never written down but have been passed down through the generations by word-of-mouth. “The story always stuck in my mind and a couple of years ago I wondered if I could resurrect it,” Lynn says.

Lynn set up shop in Warrenville, IL, USA, recreated the three original flavors and found a local brewery that would brew and bottle the beverages. For Lynn, Cripple Creek is truly a “hands-on” operation as he personally hand labels the bottles and delivers them to retailers. His wife and cousin also assist with marketing and selling the brand. 

“We are the sales force,” jokes Lynn.

The soda brand is available only in the Chicago area and is distributed to specialty food stores and a few delis and pizzerias. The brand is sold in single serve bottles at a retail price around US$1.50. Lynn got retailers on board by bringing his sodas into specialty groceries and delis and getting the owners to sample his products. 

“Once people tried it, they absolutely fell in love with it,” he says. “When (the brand) gets in some place, it sells. People really like it. It’s like in real estate, people say it’s ‘location, location, location.’ But in this industry it’s ‘distribution, distribution, distribution.'” 

Featuring cane sugar, cinnamon, and molasses, the Myers Avenue Red Root Beer offers consumers a truly old-fashioned taste that is unlike other root beers on the market, Lynn says. Celon’s Mythical creme soda adds a hint of almond for a unique flavor and the ginger ale brand is made with real ginger. All the brands are made with real cane sugar.

Lynn is now working on an orange flavor to add to the soda line, but he’s waiting to see if consumer demand warrants a fourth flavor before bottling it, he says.

The bottle labels feature old photographs of Wisner and his mining operations as well as a replica of an actual share of stock in the 1890s mining company, adding to the brand’s old-fashioned style. Lynn designed the labels based on conversations with relatives about what the original labels looked like. The Myers Avenue Red Root Beer won a bronze award in the Beverage Packaging Global Design Awards in 2000.

Lynn’s primary focus right now is expanding distribution in the Chicago area.

“I’m just trying to get a toe-hold right now. This year one of my goals is to get a restaurant account,” he says. “I’m just trying to get it into people’s hands so they can taste if for themselves.”

Red Rock Premium Strawberry

Homer Soda Company

Red Rock Premium Strawberry in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Wikipedia:

The Red Rock Company was founded in 1885 by Lee Hagan and G. T. Dodd of AtlantaGeorgia. Dodd initially introduced ginger ale as the company’s first product, which became popular in the Southern U.S. By 1938, Red Rock was an early leader in the distribution of carbonated beverages, distributing 12-ounce bottles by way of a distribution network of 200 bottlers. By 1947, Red Rock products were bottled in 47 of the 50 U.S. states but by 1958, the company’s success began to decline.

Red Rock Cola was endorsed by famous baseball player Babe Ruth, which was the only product he personally endorsed. Posters of his endorsement were printed in 1939.

Red Rock Premium Orange

Homer Soda Company

Red Rock Premium Orange in the glass-bottle

Available for wholesale distribution and private events (weddings, office parties, BBQ, the list is endless!)

Email sales@homersoda.com for current prices

Wikipedia:

The Red Rock Company was founded in 1885 by Lee Hagan and G. T. Dodd of AtlantaGeorgia. Dodd initially introduced ginger ale as the company’s first product, which became popular in the Southern U.S. By 1938, Red Rock was an early leader in the distribution of carbonated beverages, distributing 12-ounce bottles by way of a distribution network of 200 bottlers. By 1947, Red Rock products were bottled in 47 of the 50 U.S. states but by 1958, the company’s success began to decline.

Red Rock Cola was endorsed by famous baseball player Babe Ruth, which was the only product he personally endorsed. Posters of his endorsement were printed in 1939.